Texas relies on natural gas more than any other fuel for its electrical energy generation. Gas generated nearly half of the states electricity in 2019, according to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). Natural gas production was pretty much cut in half in Texas and its gas-rich Permian Basin during the current cold and stormy weather. It fell from 22.5 billion cubic feet of gas produced per day in December to in between 10 to 12 billion cubic feet of gas per day this week, according to price quotes from BTU Analytics.
The last time Texas experienced anything close to the energy crisis its experiencing this week was probably in 2011, when freezing temperature levels decreased monthly gas materials by about 10 percent.

While other states invest more in equipment that helps avoid freeze-offs, Texas hasnt seen the requirement. North Dakota usually sees 20 days a year with freeze-off events, while the Permian Basin would usually have simply four days a year with freeze-offs interrupting gas production, according to BTU Analytics.
” With gas rates being low– and storage being complete– the risk of 2-3 days of possible freeze-off every a number of years is a risk that Gulf Coast producers have wanted to take,” a report on freeze-offs gotten ready for ERCOT in 2013 states.
” A danger that Gulf Coast producers have been willing to take”
The last time Texas experienced anything near the energy crisis its experiencing today was most likely in 2011, when freezing temperature levels decreased month-to-month gas supplies by about 10 percent. That year, the United States Energy Information Administration said that energy disruptions from gas well freeze-offs rivaled interruptions from typhoons and hurricanes. Considering that then, average day-to-day gas production in the Permian Basin has more than tripled. Thats another reason why freeze-offs are a larger problem in Texas now.
When it comes to energy in Texas, they arent the only problem. The power failures have likewise stopped gas pumping facilities. Over the previous few days, just about whatever that might go incorrect has failed stunningly. And the finger-pointing is only getting going. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott required an investigation into why blackouts were so prevalent.
” This was a total failure by ERCOT,” Abbott told KTRK Houston. “ERCOT represents Electric Reliability Council of Texas, and they showed that they were not reputable.”
On the other hand, millions of individuals in Texas remain without power as a second winter storm sweeps through the state. As of Tuesday night, there was still no sign of when the interruptions would end.

Gas wells and pipelines ill-equipped for cold weather condition are a big reason countless Texans lost power during frigid temperature levels this week. As temperatures dropped to record lows across some parts of the state, liquid inside wells, valves, and pipes froze strong.
Its a phenomenon called a “freeze-off” that disrupts gas production throughout the United States every winter. The state is a huge natural gas producer– and it does not usually have to deal with such cold weather.
Texas counts on gas more than any other fuel for its electrical energy generation
” When we think of whats been going on in the last week and why its turned the market entirely on its head is the fact that the freeze offs are taking place in Texas,” says Erika Coombs, director of oil & & gas items at research firm BTU Analytics.
Texas relies on gas more than any other fuel for its electricity generation. Gas created nearly half of the states electrical power in 2019, according to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). Wind and coal each represented about 20 percent of electricity generation that year, while nuclear comprised about another 10 percent. While nuclear and wind power have been hampered by the storm, neither frigid nuclear plants nor frozen wind turbines bear the biggest share of responsibility for Texas power problems.
” It appears that a great deal of the generation that has actually gone offline today has been mostly due to problems on the gas system,” Dan Woodfin, senior director of system operations at ERCOT, said during a call with reporters on February 16th, the Texas Tribune reported.
While the freezing cold slashed fuel supplies of all sorts, it likewise drove up demand for natural gas to heat homes. That “mismatch” is whats driving these blackouts, states Coombs. There simply hasnt sufficed fuel on hand to power the states electrical energy requirements. Natural gas production was practically cut in half in Texas and its gas-rich Permian Basin throughout the current cold and stormy weather condition. It fell from 22.5 billion cubic feet of gas produced each day in December to in between 10 to 12 billion cubic feet of gas each day today, according to estimates from BTU Analytics.
That drop-off in production is thanks to freeze-offs at wellheads where oil and gas are drained of the ground. But the cold has also stopped equipment from working properly at gas processing plants, Coombs says. Processing plants separate gas from fluid and impurities; when equipment freezes, plants need to warm it up or wait on temperatures to rise before they can resume their work.

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