There are indications, he said, that even one dosage of Pfizers vaccine is pretty reliable, but for now, the underdosed people need to act as if they hadnt gotten vaccinated at all. Dr. John Swartzberg, clinical teacher emeritus of infectious illness and vaccinology at UC Berkeley Public Health, pointed out that there are no scientific studies conducted yet to figure out how effective a vaccine at a lower dosage is.RELATED: Pfizer study recommends vaccine works versus virus variantAnd he said the problem of what to do ought to fall on Cal OES and FEMA to bring together scientific minds at the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control to figure out how to proceed.But he concurred that it is not correct to provide a larger vaccine dose the 2nd time around, as the optimum amount is 0.3 milliliters and not more. That means that individuals are now getting properly dosed, but 0.1 mL of vaccine is being left behind at the bottom of the syringe, the EMT said.He likewise said there is a different spring-loaded syringe being utilized at the site that provides the proper quantity, but that tool is more costly, he said.

Gerry Meta, medical director at the Coliseum website, took concern with how much vaccine was actually left stuck behind, saying that when he tried it, he saw that a smaller sized quantity was left behind in the syringe. There are signs, he said, that even one dosage of Pfizers vaccine is quite effective, but for now, the underdosed individuals need to act as if they hadnt gotten immunized at all. Dr. John Swartzberg, scientific professor emeritus of contagious illness and vaccinology at UC Berkeley Public Health, pointed out that there are no clinical research studies carried out yet to identify how efficient a vaccine at a lower dosage is.RELATED: Pfizer study recommends vaccine works against infection variantAnd he stated the concern of what to do must fall on Cal OES and FEMA to bring together scientific minds at the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control to figure out how to proceed.But he agreed that it is not proper to give a larger vaccine dose the second time around, as the optimal quantity is 0.3 milliliters and not more. Even after these revelations have come to light, one of the EMTs who initially reached out to KTVU stated that the orange-capped syringes are still being utilized at the Coliseum site.They are now just being filled with 0.4 mL of vaccine. That means that people are now getting appropriately dosed, but 0.1 mL of vaccine is being left behind at the bottom of the syringe, the EMT said.He also stated there is a various spring-loaded syringe being utilized at the website that provides the proper quantity, but that tool is more costly, he stated.

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